Ares Rosakis

Chair’s Message

Working at the leading edges of fundamental science to invent the technologies of the future. Read More » Ares Rosakis
Otis Booth Leadership Chair, Division of Engineering and Applied Science; Theodore von Kármán Professor of Aeronautics and Professor of Mechanical Engineering

NEWS

Brent-fultz
Professor Fultz to Receive William Hume-Rothery Award 07-06-15

Brent Fultz, Barbara and Stanley R. Rawn, Jr., Professor of Materials Science and Applied Physics, has been named by the Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS) as the recipient of the 2016 William Hume-Rothery Award. He is receiving the award for “his groundbreaking contributions to the thermodynamics of materials.” This pinnacle award recognizes a scientific leader for exceptional scholarly contributions to the science of alloys. Professor Fultz will also be an honored presenter at the William Hume-Rothery Memorial Symposium held in conjunction with the TMS Annual Meeting.

Domniki-asimaki
Professor Asimaki Receives Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering Award 07-06-15

Domniki Asimaki, Professor of Mechanical and Civil Engineering has received the 2014 Young Researcher Award from the Earthquake Geotechnical Engineering and Associated Problems Technical Committee of the International Society for Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering (ISSMGE). The award recognizes early-career scientists and engineers who have exceptional promise of excellence in research and significant contributions in the field of Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering.

Haowen-ruan-and-mooseok-jang
Student Research in Biomedical Optics Wins First Place 07-02-15

Electrical Engineering postdoctoral scholar Dr. Haowen Ruan and graduate student Mooseok Jang, who work with Professor Changhuei Yang, have won first place for Best Student Poster Presentation at the Engineering Conferences International (ECI) series entitled “Advances in Optics in Biotechnology, Medicine and Surgery XIV.” Their winning poster demonstrated research in biomedical optics, specifically a novel technique that focuses light inside biological tissue by time-reversing the light encoded through popping of a microbubble. The technique has the potential to enable one to “see” through biological bodies with light.

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