Working at the leading edges of fundamental science to invent the technologies of the future.

Spotlight

News

How Electrons Break the Speed Limit

12-10-19

Marco Bernardi, Assistant Professor of Applied Physics and Materials Science, and Jinjian Zhou, Postdoctoral Scholar, have developed a way to predict how electrons interacting strongly with atomic motions will flow through a complex material. "Using a new method, we have been able to predict both the formation and the dynamics of polarons in strontium titanate. This advance is crucial since many semiconductors and oxides of interest for future electronics and energy applications exhibit polaron effects," says Bernardi. [Caltech story]

Douglas Hofmann Receives Young Innovator in the Materials Science of Additive Manufacturing Award

12-09-19

Douglas Hofmann, Visiting Associate in Applied Physics and Materials Science, has been named by the Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS) as the recipient of the 2019 "Young Innovator in the Materials Science of Additive Manufacturing Award." This award seeks to recognize an outstanding, early career individual who is performing innovative research in the area of the materials science of additive manufacturing. [Award Lectures]

Robots Compete Underground in DARPA Challenge

12-06-19

A robot named Balto designed and built by undergraduate students at Caltech working with graduate students at Caltech and JPL, which Caltech manages for NASA, took to the field in the first phase of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Subterranean (SubT) Challenge this summer, where the Caltech-JPL team took second place. The SubT Challenge is an international competition sponsored by DARPA to advance technologies to autonomously map, navigate, and search underground environments. Professor Joel Burdick, the leader of the Caltech section of the CoSTAR team says "The drones are our air-based scouts, and Balto is our eyes and ears on the ground. It's light, cheap, and fast. It can get in, find out what's going on, and help us to make decisions about how to proceed." [Caltech story]